World: Russian TV Pundit Urges Soldiers To Shoot Ukrainian POWs

Where's Putin? Leader leaves bad news on Ukraine to others

  Where's Putin? Leader leaves bad news on Ukraine to others TALLINN, Estonia (AP) — When Russia's top military brass announced in a televised appearance that they were pulling troops out of the key city of Kherson in southern Ukraine, one man missing from the room was President Vladimir Putin. As Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu and Gen. Sergei Surovikin, Russia’s chief commander in Ukraine, stiffly recited the reasons for the retreat in front of the cameras on Nov. 9, Putin was touring a neurological hospital in Moscow, watching a doctor perform brain surgery. © Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this handout photo taken from video released by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service on Wednesday, Nov.

A guest on Russian state TV raised the prospect of a Russian military unit shooting Ukrainian prisoners of war (POWs).

Ukrainian soldiers drive a tank towards Kherson's frontline on the way to Kherson on November 18, 2022. A guest on Russian state TV raised the prospect a Russian military unit shooting Ukrainian prisoners of war. © BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images Ukrainian soldiers drive a tank towards Kherson's frontline on the way to Kherson on November 18, 2022. A guest on Russian state TV raised the prospect a Russian military unit shooting Ukrainian prisoners of war.

State Duma member Alexander Kazakov made the remarks on state television in response to a recent incident that has led to Kyiv and Moscow accusing each other of a war crime.

Ukraine is investigating footage that Russia alleges shows Kyiv's forces executing more than 10 Russian soldiers who may have been attempting to surrender.

Russian soldiers are surrendering to Ukrainian drones, Ukraine says

  Russian soldiers are surrendering to Ukrainian drones, Ukraine says Video shared by Ukraine's Ministry of Defense showed a uniformed figure walking with hands raised. The MOD said the soldier was taken into captivity.In the aerial footage, a uniformed figure can be seen walking with hands raised across grassy terrain towards another figure off-camera, visible only by their shadow.

According to Reuters, the footage was recorded earlier this month in the town of Makiivka, in the Luhansk region of eastern Ukraine.

Ukraine has also accused the Russian soldiers of "perfidy" claiming they pretended to surrender but opened fire at Ukrainian troops. The circumstances surrounding the incident remain unclear.

"Regarding this specific crime, we should handle it with no regard for Western or any other opinions," Kazakov began in a clip shared on Twitter by Julia Davis, a columnist at The Daily Beast. "We have to act extremely harshly."

"We have active combat units that take no prisoners. I know of at least one such unit, a large one. I know why they're doing it, I've seen it in videos," he continued.

"They don't provide them to anyone, they take no prisoners and it's well warranted. The leadership knows this, but everyone stays quiet."

Ukraine Situation Report: Germany Deploying Patriots To Poland's Border

  Ukraine Situation Report: Germany Deploying Patriots To Poland's Border Ukraine hopes that the Patriot battery Germany will send to Poland can protect its skies from Russia as well.“I accepted with satisfaction the proposal of the German Minister of Defense regarding the deployment of additional Patriot missile launchers in our country,” Blaszczak said in a tweet. “During today's telephone conversation with the German side, I will propose that the system be stationed at the border with Ukraine.

Victor Olevich, a political analyst, hit back at Kazakov's suggestion by saying that it would be a war crime to kill Ukrainian POWs.

"There are regular POW exchanges between Russia and Ukraine. What does that signify? That Ukraine isn't killing everyone," he responded.

"This is a war crime. What we see here is a war crime. If Russia starts not to take any POWs, but just shoots everyone, then the Ukrainian side will also be shooting ours. Is this what Russia needs? No, of course this isn't what Russia needs," Olevich said.

Russian and Ukrainian authorities said on Wednesday that both countries conducted another exchange of prisoners of war.

After Russian retreat, Ukrainian military plans next move

  After Russian retreat, Ukrainian military plans next move KHERSON, Ukraine (AP) — The Ukrainian sniper adjusted his scope and fired a.50-caliber bullet at a Russian soldier across the Dnieper River. Earlier, another Ukrainian used a drone to scan for Russian troops. Two weeks after retreating from the southern city of Kherson, Russia is pounding the town with artillery as it digs in across the Dnieper River. Ukraine is striking back at Russian troops with its own long-distance weapons, and Ukrainian officers say they want to capitalize on their momentum.The Russian withdrawal from the only provincial capital it gained in nine months of war was one of Moscow's most significant battlefield losses.

Andriy Yermak, the head of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's office, said 35 soldiers and one civilian returned to Ukraine from captivity.

"Among those released are the guys who defended Mariupol and were at Azovstal, as well as the National Guardsmen captured at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the early days of the invasion," Yermak said, adding that the freed civilian had a leg amputated.

Russia's defense ministry said "as a result of the negotiation process, 35 Russian servicemen were returned from the territory controlled by the Kiev regime."

The ministry said the Russian soldiers would be sent to Moscow for treatment and rehabilitation.

Newsweek has contacted Russia's foreign ministry for comment.

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Ukraine Situation Report: Russian Artillery Advantage Diminishing .
For a variety of reasons, the ratio of Russian artillery volleys compared to Ukrainian ones is decreasing, a Pentagon official said.But as both sides continue to fire thousands of artillery rounds at each other every day, Russia’s vast numerical superiority is diminishing, a senior U.S. military official told reporters, including from The War Zone, Tuesday morning.

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