World: The lost nuclear bombs of the USA

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The United States alone will officially miss eleven explosive bombs. Where are you, what happened to you and how could it come about?

Atomexplosion © ROMOLOTAVANI/ISTOCK Nuclear explosion "Broken Arrow": Lost nuclear weapons

On the morning of January 17, 1966, a B-52-bomber went on a rendezvous course with a KC-135 tank aircraft . First everything runs according to plan-then the tankers of the KC-135 roam the bomber's metal back. Sparks inflaming fuel, transform the aircraft filled with kerosene into a fireball.

four soldiers die. And: In addition to rubble parts, four bombs also rain from the sky. With two, the parachute does not open so that you detonate on the floor - and contaminate 180 hectares with radioactive plutonium. Another bomb is found undamaged a little later, the fourth falls into the Mediterranean, staying disappeared for months.

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The terrifying one: Palomares is not an isolated case - the USA alone still missed officially eleven fully explosive bombs . Independent estimates even assume up to 700 incidents in which 1250 nuclear weapons were involved. Sometimes an aircraft with core explosives over the Atlantic disappears, sometimes a submarine equipped with atom-torpedos goes under, sometimes a bomb rolls from an aircraft carrier. Since such "incidents" represent a taboo that is to be concealed to the public, every lost nuclear weapon of the Code "Broken Arrow" is included.

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What is behind the disappearance of the bombs

The reason for the accidents of accidents lies in the Cold War: From 1960 to 1968 patrol more patrol around the U.S. bomber team near the Soviet Airspace. Your mission is to fly a massive retaliation in the event of a nuclear first strike within a very short time. Each of the US bombers wears four hydrogen bombs with the 100-fold explosive force of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs.

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Only after another misfortune in Greenland does the US Air Force end the operation - intercontinental missiles make it possible to do without the expensive air patrols. According to official information, no US nuclear weapon has been lost since 1968. However, nobody knows how many are still scattered on the world:

"It is assumed that up to 50 nuclear weapons worldwide have been lost during the Cold War," says Otfried Nassauer , expert in nuclear equipment.

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Three ways Chinese nuclear buildup threatens US national security interests .
The head of the U.S. Strategic Command, Adm. Charles Richard, recently alerted the world that when it comes to deterrence against China, “the ship is slowly sinking.” That warning came on the heels of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s call for “a strong system of strategic deterrence,” a likely reference to Beijing’s nuclear arsenal, at the recent 20th Chinese Communist Party Congress. Richard’s and Xi’s comments confirm what we have been learning about China’s buildup of its nuclear forces that have the potential to match—or even overtake—those of the United States.

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