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World:Ethiopian plane smoked and shuddered before deadly plunge

Ethiopia Airlines Updates: Boeing 737 Crash Kills at Least 150

Ethiopia Airlines Updates: Boeing 737 Crash Kills at Least 150 ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — An Ethiopian Airlines flight carrying more than 150 people crashed early Sunday shortly after departing from the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, en route to Nairobi, Kenya, the airline said, killing everyone onboard. The plane was identified by its manufacturer, Boeing, as one of its newest models, a 737 Max 8. The cause of the crash was unclear, but a Lion Air flight using the same model of plane went down in Indonesia in October and killed 189 people.

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GARA-BOKKA, Ethiopia (Reuters) - The Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed killing 157 people was making a strange rattling noise and trailed smoke and debris as it swerved above a field of panicked cows before hitting earth, according to witnesses.

Flight 302 took off from the Ethiopian capital on Sunday morning bound for Nairobi with passengers from more than 30 countries. All on board the Boeing 737 MAX 8 died.

Pilot of Crashed Jet Reported Flight-Control Problems

Pilot of Crashed Jet Reported Flight-Control Problems The pilot of the Ethiopian Airlines jet that crashed reported that he was having flight-control problems and wanted to return to the airport, the chief executive of the airline said. In recordings of the pilot’s conversations with controllers, he didn’t indicate any external problems with the jet or the flight, like a bird collision, CEO Tewolde Gebremariam told The Wall Street Journal. Get news and analysis on politics, policy, national security and more, delivered right to your inbox The pilot “reported back to air-traffic controllers that he was having flight-control problems” and wanted to return to Addis Ababa, Mr.

The pilot had requested permission to return, saying he was having problems - but it was too late.

Half a dozen witnesses interviewed by Reuters in the farmland where the plane came down reported smoke billowing out behind, while four of them also described a loud sound.

"It was a loud rattling sound. Like straining and shaking metal," said Turn Buzuna, a 26-year-old housewife and farmer who lives about 300 meters (328 yards) from the crash site.

"Everyone says they have never heard that kind of sound from a plane and they are under a flight path," she added.

Malka Galato, 47, a barley and wheat farmer whose field the plane crashed in, also described smoke and sparks from the back. "The plane was very close to the ground and it made a turn... Cows that were grazing in the fields ran in panic," he said.

Tamirat Abera, 25, was walking past the field at the time. He said the plane turned sharply, trailing white smoke and items like clothes and papers, then crashed about 300 meters away.

"It tried to climb but it failed and went down nose first," he said. "There was fire and white smoke which then turned black."

CHILDREN'S BOOKS, PERFUME AT CRASH

As the plane had only just taken off, it was loaded with fuel.

At the site, Red Cross workers in masks sifted gently through victims' belongings. Children's books - Dr Seuss's "Oh The Thinks You Can Think" and "Anne of Green Gables" - lay near a French-English dictionary burned along one edge.

Families of Ethiopian plane disaster victims steel themselves for journey to crash site

Families of Ethiopian plane disaster victims steel themselves for journey to crash site Ethiopians clad in traditional mourning shawls and other black clothing gathered silently in a hotel conference room in Addis Ababa on Thursday, the loved ones of victims of ET Flight 302, before boarding buses headed for the crash site. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Couples held each other, slumped forward in their chairs and gazing downwards. Some men held their heads in their hands. Women in head scarves leaned for comfort against the chests of their relatives.

Ethiopian plane smoked and shuddered before deadly plunge© Reuters/TIKSA NEGERI Ethiopian Federal policemen stand at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu

A woman's brown handbag, the bottom burned, lay open next to an empty bottle of perfume.

The aircraft was broken into small pieces, the largest among them a wheel and a dented engine. The debris was spread over land roughly the size of two soccer fields.

Investigators found two black box recorders on Monday, which will help piece together the plane's final minutes.

"When it was hovering, fire was following its tail, then it tried to lift its nose," said another witness, Gadisa Benti. "When it passed over our house, the nose pointed down and the tail raised up. It went straight to the ground with its nose, it then exploded."

Local resident Nigusu Tesema helped gather victims' scattered identity papers to hand to police.

"We are shocked and saddened," he said.

(Additional reporting by Kumerra Gemechu and Tiksa Negeri; Writing by Katharine Houreld; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne)

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These men lost their wives and children in the Ethiopia plane crash. Instead of bodies, they bring back soil.
Paul Njoroge and his father-in-law John Quindos Karanja walked away from the site where their wives and children died with bags of soil in their hands. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Three generations of their family were on the Ethiopian Airlines flight to Kenya that crashed last week just minutes after takeoff in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, killing all 157 people on board.

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