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World: U.S. Protections for Some Haitian Migrants Partially Responsible for Border Surge

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Protections offered by the United States for some Haitian migrants are partially responsible for the surge in migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, in addition to word spreading via social media, the Associated Press reported.

Deportation fears mounted Thursday among Haitian migrants camped out in northern Mexico near the border with the United States following the sudden arrival of dozens of police officers at the site. Haitian migrants prepare to cross the Rio Grande river, as seen from Ciudad Acuna, Coahuila state, Mexico on Sept. 23, 2021. © Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images Deportation fears mounted Thursday among Haitian migrants camped out in northern Mexico near the border with the United States following the sudden arrival of dozens of police officers at the site. Haitian migrants prepare to cross the Rio Grande river, as seen from Ciudad Acuna, Coahuila state, Mexico on Sept. 23, 2021.

The Biden administration cited security concerns and social unrest in Haiti this spring when it extended temporary protections to some Haitian migrants living in the U.S. The protections were limited only to those who already were living in the U.S. before July 29, according to Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.

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Mayorkas said that "we are very concerned that Haitians who are taking the irregular migration path are receiving misinformation that the border is open" or were mistakenly led to believe they qualified for protected status, the AP reported.

"I want to make sure it is known that this is not the way to come to the United States," he said.

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

For the final leg of his journey from Chile to the United States, Haitian migrant Fabricio Jean followed detailed instructions sent to him via WhatsApp from his brother in New Jersey who had recently taken the route to the Texas border.

His brother wired him money for the trip, then meticulously mapped it out, warning him of areas heavy with Mexican immigration officials.

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"You will need about 20,000 pesos [about $1,000 U.S. dollars] for the buses. You need to take this bus to this location and then take another bus," recounted Jean, who spoke to the AP after reaching the border town of Del Rio.

What Jean didn't expect was to find thousands of Haitian migrants like himself crossing at the same remote spot. The 38-year-old, his wife and two young children earlier this month joined as many as 14,000 mostly Haitian migrants camped under a Del Rio bridge.

A confluence of factors caused the sudden sharp increase at the Texas town of about 35,000 residents.

Interviews with dozens of Haitian migrants, immigration attorneys and advocates reflect the power of Facebook, YouTube and platforms like WhatsApp, which migrants use to share information that can get distorted as it speeds through immigrant communities, directing migration flows.

Online messages touting the Mexican town of Ciudad Acuña, across from Del Rio, started after President Joe Biden took office and began reversing some of the Trump administration's immigration policies.

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Ciudad Acuña has been spared the drug and gang violence seen elsewhere along the border. Some of the social media posts recommending it appear to have come from human smugglers seeking to drum up business, according to immigrant advocates.

Haitians began crossing there this year, but their numbers ballooned after a Biden administration program that briefly opened the door to some asylum seekers ended, said Nicole Phillips, of the San Diego-based Haitian Bridge Alliance, which advocates for Haitian migrants. The program allowed in a select number of people deemed by humanitarian groups to be at high risk in Mexico.

Once it ceased in August, people panicked, and the messages recommending Ciudad Acuña "went viral," Phillips said.

"That's why they rushed at this time to get in," she said. "They realized they wouldn't be able to get in legally through a port of entry like they were hoping."

Del Rio is just one example of how technology that has put a smartphone in the hands of nearly every migrant is transforming migration flows, according to advocates. Migrants often monitor the news and share information on routes. The most popular platform is WhatsApp, which connects 2 billion people worldwide.

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In 2018, social media posts and WhatsApp messages fueled caravans that swelled to 10,000 mostly Central American migrants who arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Last week, in a Facebook group for Haitians in Chile with 26,000 members, one member posted specific instructions on routes through Mexico. It included paths to avoid and recommended certain bus companies.

"Good luck and be careful," said the post, written in Haitian Creole.

Another member shared a different route in the comments. The group's members have since relayed stories of horrific conditions in Del Rio and the risks of being deported.

The International Organization for Migration found most of the 238 Haitians who were surveyed in March after passing through a 60-mile stretch of jungle between Colombia and Panama known as the Darien Gap received route information from family or friends who had made the dangerous trek.

About 15 percent said they saw instructions on the internet.

Agency spokesman Jorge Gallo said the instructions led the migrants to believe crossing the gap was "difficult but not impossible."

But just as similar messages drew many Haitians to Del Rio, news of the Biden administration deporting hundreds on the Texas border caused some to change their plans.

A 32-year-old Haitian woman who made it to Del Rio with her two teenage children bought bus tickets to Mexico City after receiving a cousin's audio message via WhatsApp. She previously lived in Chile for four years.

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  Haitians see history of racist policies in migrant treatment The images — men on horseback, appearing to use reins as whips to corral Haitian asylum seekers trying to cross into the U.S. from Mexico — provoked an outcry. But to many Haitians and Black Americans, they're merely confirmation of a deeply held belief: U.S. immigration policies, they say, are and have long been anti-Black. The Border Patrol's treatment of Haitian migrants, they say, is just the latest in a long history of discriminatory U.S. policies and of indignities faced by Black people, sparking new anger among Haitian Americans, Black immigrant advocates and civil rights leaders.( AP Photo/Felix Marquez, File) U.S.

"Wait in Mexico until this month is over. They will pick up everyone under the bridge. After that, they will give me the contact to enter Miami," said the recording in Creole, which she played for an AP reporter. The AP is withholding the woman's name to protect her safety.

Facebook, which owns WhatsApp, allows people to exchange information about crossing borders, even illegally, but its policy bars posts that ask for money for services that facilitate human smuggling.

A combination of social media and protections offered by the U.S. for some Haitian migrants have contributed to the surge of migrants at the border. A portrait is seen in a phone case as a migrant arrives at a humanitarian center after they were released from United States Border Patrol upon crossing the Rio Grande and turning themselves in seeking asylum, Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. Julio Cortez/AP Photo © Julio Cortez/AP Photo A combination of social media and protections offered by the U.S. for some Haitian migrants have contributed to the surge of migrants at the border. A portrait is seen in a phone case as a migrant arrives at a humanitarian center after they were released from United States Border Patrol upon crossing the Rio Grande and turning themselves in seeking asylum, Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. Julio Cortez/AP Photo

Related Articles

  • DHS: 1,400 Haitians Expelled, 3,200 Sent to Other Border Patrol Facilities for Processing
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  • U.S. Special Envoy to Haiti Resigns Over 'Inhumane' Deportations of Migrants
  • DHS Rejects Claims Haitian Migrants at Border Will Be Sent to Guantánamo
  • Haitian Migrant Camp in Mexico Surrounded by Police, Prompting Some to Rush Toward U.S.

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Mexican Police Fine Taxi Driver $900 for Taking Haitian Migrants Toward U.S. Border .
"They accused me of being an immigrant trafficker," said Eliseo Ortiz, a taxi driver in Mexico.The Mexican government is putting pressure on local businesses to not help move migrants north. Eliseo Ortiz, a taxi driver in Ciudad Acuña, will no longer pick up Haitian migrants after he was fined $900 three months ago.

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