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World: How Meghan Markle's Royal Exit Echoes Princess Mako of Japan

mako from Japan: a week of her wedding, hard blow for the princess who celebrates her 30 years

 mako from Japan: a week of her wedding, hard blow for the princess who celebrates her 30 years © AFLO / Bestimage Mako from Japan: to a week of her wedding, hard blow for the princess who celebrates her 30 years After blowing his thirty candles, there are only three days left to wait for the Mako princess of Japan. This Tuesday, October 26 will finally be celebrated his marriage with the lawyer Kei Komuro. Today, Saturday, October 23, 2021, Princess Mako of Japan celebrates her 30 years .

Princess Mako of Japan will say goodbye to he royal status tomorrow in order to marry a commoner—in a story with echoes of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry.

Meghan Markle, left, during her last official royal duty at Westminster Abbey, London, on March 9, 2020. And, right, Princess Mako waves after listening to Emperor Naruhito of Japan make his first public speech from the balcony of the Imperial Palace on May 4, 2019 in Tokyo © Getty Images Meghan Markle, left, during her last official royal duty at Westminster Abbey, London, on March 9, 2020. And, right, Princess Mako waves after listening to Emperor Naruhito of Japan make his first public speech from the balcony of the Imperial Palace on May 4, 2019 in Tokyo

The royal and fiance Kei Komuro will tie the knot after being vilified in the Japanese media to the point Mako was said by the royal household to have experienced PTSD.

Japanese rules around relationships with commoners are more strict than Britain's and the public are, according to The Guardian, more deferential to the Imperial Family.

Defying public scorn and media storm, Japan’s princess is finally set to marry her man

  Defying public scorn and media storm, Japan’s princess is finally set to marry her man When Princess Mako of Japan weds in Tokyo, there will be no lavish ceremony, and none of the rites traditionally associated with Japanese royal weddings. In another first, she is forgoing the lump-sum payment of about $1.3 million that female royals receive after they lose their imperial status by marrying a commoner. The reason: public disapproval of her groom, Kei Komuro, 30, a recent law graduate, because of a financial dispute involving his mother.

However, there remain some striking similarities between their broken fairy tale and the experiences of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

A New Life in America

Mako is Emperor Naruhito's niece and fell for her fiance while they were at Tokyo's International Christian University together.

However, rules in Japan are a little more strict than in Britain and it is forbidden for a royal to marry a commoner.

When she ties the knot on Tuesday, October 26, she will cease to be royal and instead have a new life awaiting her in New York.

While Harry and Meghan were not required to quit royal duties like Princess Mako, they said they felt they had no choice because they were struggling emotionally with hostile media coverage.

Factbox: Who are Japan's Princess Mako and her husband, Kei Komuro?

  Factbox: Who are Japan's Princess Mako and her husband, Kei Komuro? Factbox: Who are Japan's Princess Mako and her husband, Kei Komuro?TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan's Princess Mako, the emperor's niece, on Tuesday married her college sweetheart, a commoner named Kei Komuro, by submitting documents to register her marriage, after a long engagement marked by intense media scrutiny and opposition.

They too chose America when they found their freedom but are on the west coast in Montecito, Santa Barbara.

Princess Mako's Different Royal Destiny

The princess' path may well have been influenced by the fact she was never destined for the throne.

In Japan, only men can rule meaning she was never preparing herself for the highest office royalty can offer.

Prince Harry technically was in the line of succession but, as the second born son, he would only be needed in the event of tragedy.

He was in a position commonly referred to in Britain as the "spare" to the first born heir.

Princess Mako and her fiancee Kei Komuro announce their engagement at the Akasaka East Residence in Tokyo on September 3, 2017. The couple are starting a new life in New York. SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/AFP via Getty Images © SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/AFP via Getty Images Princess Mako and her fiancee Kei Komuro announce their engagement at the Akasaka East Residence in Tokyo on September 3, 2017. The couple are starting a new life in New York. SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/AFP via Getty Images

A Hostile Public and Media

Mako and Komuro got a positive initial reception which turned hostile in the tabloids and even some broadsheets after allegations over money that was given to his mother by her former fiance, The Guardian reported.

Japan's Princess Mako marries non-royal boyfriend Kei Komuro in subdued ceremony

  Japan's Princess Mako marries non-royal boyfriend Kei Komuro in subdued ceremony Japan's Princess Mako has married her non-royal college sweetheart Kei Komuro in a subdued ceremony, formally marking her departure from the royal family. © Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images Former princess Mako arrives at a Tokyo hotel for a press event with Komuro after registering their marriage on Tuesday. The couple submitted their registration at the local ward office around 10 a.m. local time Tuesday, according to the Imperial Household Agency, forgoing the usual pomp and circumstance of most royal weddings. The newlyweds are expected to move to New York City, where Komuro works at a law firm.

The newspaper described how the ¥4m ($35,200) was partly used to pay for her son's education but there has been a dispute over whether it was a gift or a loan.

The scandal caused the wedding to be delayed two years and a wave of hostile media coverage that has extended beyond the original issue and onto to such subjects as his ponytail haircut.

Kaori Hayashi, a media professor at Tokyo University, told The Guardian: "Weekly magazines and daytime TV shows are reporting frantically on this because it helps their sales and viewing figures.

"They are particularly critical of the Komuros because they are not fully protected by Imperial Household Agency [the Japanese government agency in charge or royal affairs]."

Meghan told Oprah Winfrey the tide turned in her relations with the media in November 2019 after a story suggesting she had made Kate Middleton cry, which she said was untrue.

Afterwards, there were a series of more trivial criticisms, including over her dark nail varnish and how often she touched her baby bump.

Both couples have also triggered debates about public money being spent on them, after Mako and Komuro turned down public funding normally given to royals.

Japan's Princess Mako weds, then goes on TV to defend the marriage

  Japan's Princess Mako weds, then goes on TV to defend the marriage Her new husband's family became tabloid fodder almost as soon as she announced her decision to marry him. She calls him "irreplaceable."Flanked by her brand new husband during a ten-minute afternoon address broadcast on all major networks from a Tokyo hotel, the former princess, now officially Mako Komuro, called husband Kei Komuro "irreplaceable.

Harry and Meghan came under pressure over public money spent on the refurbishment of their U.K. home, Frogmore Cottage, and had their taxpayer funded police protection detail removed.

Mental Health Concerns

Princess Mako has experienced Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following the couple's experiences of media negativity, the Imperial Household Agency announced earlier this month.

Meghan told Oprah she experienced suicidal thoughts in the wake of hostile media coverage while she was a working royal.

She said: "I just didn't want to be alive any more. And that was a very clear and real and frightening constant thought.

"And I remember how he [Harry] just cradled me. I went to the institution, and I said that I needed to go somewhere to get help. I said that I've never felt this way before, and I need to go somewhere.

"And I was told that I couldn't, that it wouldn't be good for the institution."

Princess Mako of Japan, at the Rakuten Open in Ariake Colosseum, Tokyo, on October 3, 2016, had a similar experience to Meghan Markle, seen at Global Citizen Live, New York on September 25, 2021. Mako and her fiance had to abandon royal life in order to marry because he is a commoner. Koji Watanabe/Getty Images and Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Global Citizen © Koji Watanabe/Getty Images and Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Global Citizen Princess Mako of Japan, at the Rakuten Open in Ariake Colosseum, Tokyo, on October 3, 2016, had a similar experience to Meghan Markle, seen at Global Citizen Live, New York on September 25, 2021. Mako and her fiance had to abandon royal life in order to marry because he is a commoner. Koji Watanabe/Getty Images and Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Global Citizen

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Mako Komuro Isn't the First Female Scion of Japan's Royal Family to Have Suffered From Mental Stress .
The former princess Mako Komuro is not the only Japanese royal to have experienced issues related to mental wellbeingNobody was surprised by the low-key approach. Earlier this month, officials of the Imperial Household Agency said that Mako was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder due to “excessive media coverage” of her relationship with Komuro since its beginnings in 2017. Press interest became frenzied after a financial scandal involving Komuro’s mother and the mother’s ex-fiancé came to light in early 2018.

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