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World: Ethiopia's Nobel Peace-Winning Prime Minister Says Current War Is a 'Time for Martyrdom'

Secretary of state making 1st trip to Africa amid growing crises in Ethiopia, Sudan

  Secretary of state making 1st trip to Africa amid growing crises in Ethiopia, Sudan The U.S. will be touting the millions of vaccines donated to the continent. Nearly 10 months into his tenure, Blinken will bring U.S. President Joe Biden's "America's back" mantra to the world's youngest continent. But for years now, the United States has been playing catch-up to China in many of Africa's 54 countries. China has promoted deep business and diplomatic ties and invested in infrastructure, while the U.S. has said next to nothing about the region's democratic backsliding.

Ethiopia ' s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was once widely praised outside the country for his reforming zeal but that image was shattered after he launched a civil war in the north of the country in November 2020. Bagging the Nobel Peace Prize in October 2019 for finally bringing an end to the 20-year stalemate with Eritrea cemented his international status. But the war in Ethiopia ' s Tigray region has meant a rapid reversal. He passed his first electoral test in June in polls marred by a partial opposition boycott and postponements in parts of the country because of insecurity.

The prime minister of Ethiopia , Abiy Ahmed, who forged a peace deal with Eritrea last year, has won the 2019 Nobel peace prize. The award recognised Abiy’ s “efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring His public renunciation of past abuses drew a line between his administration and those of his predecessors, as did the appointment of former dissidents and large numbers of women to senior roles. Abiy said : “I am so humbled and thrilled thank you very much. It is a prize given to Africa, given to

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed said he will lead his country "from the battlefront" beginning Tuesday, a new step in the yearlong war against rival Tigray forces.

Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed says he will lead his country's army © Mulugeta Ayene, File/AP Photo Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed says he will lead his country's army "from the battlefront" beginning Tuesday, Nov. 23, a dramatic new step by the Nobel Peace Prize-winner in a devastating yearlong war. Above, Abiy speaks behind bulletproof glass at his inauguration ceremony, after he was sworn in for a second five-year term, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Monday, Oct. 4.

"This is a time when leading a country with martyrdom is needed," Abiy, winner of the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize, said in a statement posted on social media Monday night.

Protestors call out Joe Biden's foreign policy in Ethiopia while its diaspora remains divided over civil war

  Protestors call out Joe Biden's foreign policy in Ethiopia while its diaspora remains divided over civil war Ethiopian Americans tell Insider they are upset with Joe Biden's policy toward Ethiopia. They want the White House to support the democratically elected leaders. "It's a lot of disappointment in the suffering that's happening back in our native country," Aregawi said. "A lot of disappointment in our home here in America and that some officials just don't seem to be living up to values that we expected them to.

Ethiopia ’ s prime minister , Abiy Ahmed, has vowed to lead his country’s troops “from the battlefront”, the latest dramatic step by the Nobel Peace prize winner in a devastating year-long war with rebel groups. “Starting tomorrow, I will mobilise to the front to lead the defence forces,” Abiy, said in a statement posted on Twitter on Tens of thousands of people have been killed in the war between Ethiopian and allied forces and fighters from the country’s northern Tigray region. A de facto blockade on Tigray has triggered a humanitarian crisis and prevented the delivery of essential medical supplies.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, began a sweeping military operation against one of his own regions. He issued a bellicose declaration that sent waves of alarm across the region and stoked fears that Ethiopia — Africa’ s second-most populous country — was suddenly sliding toward a destructive civil war . Mr. Abiy made his move against the region, Tigray, early Wednesday as the world’ s attention was focused on vote-counting in the U. S . presidential election.

The Associated Press reported that an estimated tens of thousands of people have been killed in the war between Ethiopian and allied forces and forces from the northern Tigray region. This region dominated the national government before Abiy took office.

The Tigray region, with a population of around 6 million, has been under a months-long blockade by the Ethiopian government. The Tigray People's Liberation Front wants the blockade lifted and Abiy out of power.

Abiy's government has referred to the Tigray conflict as an "existential war." According to the AP, Ethiopia's military has been weakened in recent months and retreated from Tigray in June. The government has called on able citizens to join the fight. Ethnic-based regional forces have also helped.

Central European nations back Poland in migration dispute

  Central European nations back Poland in migration dispute BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — The leaders of three Central European countries on Tuesday expressed their solidarity with Poland in an ongoing migration crisis on its eastern border with Belarus, and urged the European Union to increase its support for the protection of the bloc's external borders. At a news briefing in Hungary's capital of Budapest following talks between the prime ministers of Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said the situation on his country's eastern border went beyond migration.

Ethiopia ’ s prime minister was feted by the international community as a reformer and a peacemaker. Now, as the Guardian’s Jason Burke explains, he has launched a major military campaign in the north of his country that threatens the stability of the region. His peacemaking efforts with neighbouring Eritrea had been recognised with a Nobel peace prize and his domestic reforms were winning plaudits. This month, however, it is a different story. The Guardian’s Africa correspondent Jason Burke tells Rachel Humphreys that Abiy Ahmed has launched a major military operation in the northern region of

Ethiopia ' s Nobel Peace Prize- winning prime minister is warning that if there's a need to go to war over a dam project disputed with Egypt his country could ready millions of people, but he says only negotiation can resolve the deadlock. "Some say things about use of force (by Egypt). It should be underlined that no force could stop Ethiopia from building a dam," Ethiopia ' s prime minister said . "If there is a need to go to war , we could get millions readied. If some could fire a missile, others could use bombs.

With Tigray forces moving toward Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian government declared a state of emergency this month.

"Let's meet at the battlefront," Abiy said in the statement.

In response, Getachew Reda, a spokesman for the Tigray forces, tweeted "our forces won't relent on their inexorable advance towards bringing (Abiy's) chokehold on our people to an end."

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

The statement by the prime minister, a former soldier, did not say where exactly he will go Tuesday. His spokeswoman, Billene Seyoum, did not respond to a request for comment.

The prime minister's statement also claimed that the West is trying to defeat Ethiopia, the latest pushback against what his government has described as meddling by the international community. Envoys from the African Union and the U.S. have continued diplomatic efforts in pursuit of a ceasefire to the fighting and talks without preconditions on a political solution.

US: 'Nascent' progress in Ethiopia talks could be outpaced

  US: 'Nascent' progress in Ethiopia talks could be outpaced NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A United States envoy said Tuesday he sees “nascent progress” in talks with Ethiopia’s warring sides toward a cease-fire, but he fears it will be outpaced by “alarming” military developments in the yearlong war in Africa's second-most populous country. Jeffrey Feltman spoke to reporters after his latest visit to Ethiopia, where rival Tigray forces continue pushing toward the capital, Addis Ababa, and a growing number of countries tell their citizens to leave immediately. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed on Monday announced he will lead “from the battlefield” in a war that is estimated to have killed tens of thousands of people.

Abiy Ahmed, the prime minister of Ethiopia , was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, for his work in restarting peace talks with neighboring Eritrea and beginning to restore freedoms in his country after decades of political and economic repression. Mr. Abiy, 43, broke through two decades of “This is just legitimizing the dictatorship.” Mr. Davison said changes within Ethiopia also had a long way to go. “There have been significant initial improvements in Ethiopia -Eritrea relations, but it is a work in progress, and there’ s a lot of tough work to be done. We can say exactly the same for the internal

Shortly after Abiy's announcement, a senior State Department official told reporters the U.S. still believes "a small window of opportunity exists" in the mediation efforts.

The prime minister chaired an executive meeting Monday of the ruling Prosperity Party, and Defense Minister Abraham Belay told state media that "all security forces will start taking special measures and tactics as of tomorrow." He declined to elaborate.

Abiy's announcement brought shock from the man who nominated him for the Nobel, Awol Allo, a senior lecturer in law at Keele University in Britain. "The announcement is replete with languages of martyrdom and sacrifice," he said in a tweet. "This is so extraordinary and unprecedented, shows how desperate the situation is."

The prime minister in his 2019 Nobel acceptance speech spoke passionately about war: "I crawled my way to peace through the dusty trenches of war years ago. ... I witnessed firsthand the ugliness of war in frontline battles. ... War is the epitome of hell for all involved. I know because I have been there and back."

US, others warn citizens in Ethiopia to leave as prime minister heads to front lines

  US, others warn citizens in Ethiopia to leave as prime minister heads to front lines The U.S. government is warning American citizens in Ethiopia even more starkly to leave the country now, as the conflict there continues to deteriorate. Your browser does not support this video Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is heading to the front lines to lead the federal government's forces, he announced, urging his fellow citizens to join him and "lead the country with a sacrifice.

Abiy was awarded the Nobel for making peace with neighboring Eritrea, on whose border he fought while stationed in the Tigray region.

The terms of that peace deal have never been made public. Critics of the current conflict allege that the deal was instead an agreement for the two countries to wage war on the Tigray leaders, who were unpopular among many Ethiopians for their repressive 27-year rule despite significant development gains.

Eritrean soldiers have been blamed for some of the worst atrocities in the war, even as Abiy denied for months that they were inside Tigray.

Ethiopia's prime minister said he is preparing as rival Tigray forces approach Addis Ababa. Above, people gather behind a placard showing Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed at a rally organized by local authorities to show support for the Ethiopian National Defense Force, at Meskel square in downtown Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Sunday, Nov. 7. Placard in Amharic reads: © File/AP Photo Ethiopia's prime minister said he is preparing as rival Tigray forces approach Addis Ababa. Above, people gather behind a placard showing Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed at a rally organized by local authorities to show support for the Ethiopian National Defense Force, at Meskel square in downtown Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Sunday, Nov. 7. Placard in Amharic reads: "We Have Respect For Our Brave National Army". File/AP Photo

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Ethiopia to US: Stop spreading 'false information' about war .
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Ethiopia’s government on Thursday warned the United States against “spreading false information” as fighting in the country’s yearlong war draws closer to the capital, Addis Ababa, while thousands protested outside the U.S. and British embassies. Ethiopia’s war is not only against forces from the country’s Tigray region “but also with colonialism of the powerful states of the West,” government spokesman Kebede Desisa said. Some Ethiopians were outraged this week when a U.S. Embassy security message warned its citizens of possible terrorist attacks in the country. The U.S.

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