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World: Joe Biden, country killer

Analysis: Americans aren't feeling relief from Biden's big Washington victory

  Analysis: Americans aren't feeling relief from Biden's big Washington victory If it was just about selling Americans on the infrastructure law, Democrats might have a hope. © Evan Vucci/AP President Joe Biden speaks during a visit to the NH 175 bridge over the Pemigewasset River to promote infrastructure spending Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021, in Woodstock, N.H. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) As the White House struggles to pitch President Joe Biden's big infrastructure win -- a bipartisan law that may actually deserve the over-used description "historic" -- ahead of next year's midterms, its political salesmanship is already coming under fire.

President Joe Biden met with Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al Kadhimi at the White House on Monday.

a man wearing a suit and tie © Provided by Washington Examiner

It wasn't just any leader-to-leader meeting. Biden announced that the United States would soon end its combat mission in Iraq. The move comes just a few months short of the 10th anniversary of America’s last withdrawal from Iraq.

Back then, Biden was optimistic. "I can tell you that when we came to office, we had, we had over 150,000 folks there, a war with no political end in sight. And after three years, we've met our commitment, brought the war to a responsible end," the then-vice president told an NPR interviewer. History did judge. Just three years later, U.S. military forces were back to combat the threat posed by the Islamic State — a threat that had arisen in the vacuum of America's withdrawal. Tens of thousands of Iraqis died, centuries-old churches were dynamited, and ISIS radicals raped countless Yazidis, some of whom remain enslaved today in areas of Syria controlled by Turkish-backed militias.

6 Theories of Joe Biden’s Crumbling Popularity

  6 Theories of Joe Biden’s Crumbling Popularity The president’s approval ratings keep falling. The question is why.Biden began his presidency moderately popular: At the start, Quinnipiac University’s polling found that 53 percent of Americans approved of him and 36 percent did not. Today’s numbers are the mirror image: In a Quinnipiac poll released yesterday, 36 percent approve, while 53 percent disapprove. FiveThirtyEight’s average of polls finds him doing slightly better—42.8 to 51.7—but still in a consistent slide since the end of July. The numbers are very polarized, but Republicans have always disapproved strongly of Biden; the big difference here is erosion among Democrats and independents.

Biden remains best known in Iraq for his 2006 article proposing Iraq’s division into three ethnic and sectarian Bantustans. It was a recipe for disaster and civil war, given that fault lines between Iraq’s constituent communities are not so neatly defined. It also provided Iran with a tremendous propaganda boost since Tehran could tell Iraqi Shiites that the U.S. sought to undermine the empowerment democracy brought the Shiites and that they had no choice but to return to Iran’s umbrella. Biden renounced his opinions, but the damage was done.

The decision to end the combat mission in Iraq is strike three for Biden. Top aides might whisper that this is less a withdrawal than a rebranding, but such nuance and spin means little outside Washington. The images of the Taliban’s rout of Afghan forces against the backdrop of Biden’s other unilateral withdrawal matter. The message Biden has sent U.S. adversaries, including Iran, China, Russia, Turkey, and Pakistan, is that the U.S. does not stand by its allies and does not have the will to fight. If Iranian agents or their proxies increase attacks against American personnel and diplomatic property, Tehran believes it can force a more complete American withdrawal. After all, it worked for Hezbollah in Lebanon during the Reagan administration, for warlords in Somalia under Bill Clinton, and now in Afghanistan, so why should Iraq be different?

Donald Trump Strongly Hints at 2024 Run as Multiple Polls Show Him Beating Biden

  Donald Trump Strongly Hints at 2024 Run as Multiple Polls Show Him Beating Biden Although both Trump's and Biden's favorability remains low, several recent polls have shown the former president favored to win the next presidential election. "President Trump cares deeply about the country and is keeping all of his options open," she said in an email. During a February speech to Republicans in Boston, Bannon predicted Trump would be back in charge after the 2024 election. "He'll come back to us. We'll have a sweeping victory in 2022, and he'll lead us in 2024,"said the close ally of the former president said, per The Boston Herald.

The simple fact is that first in Afghanistan and now in Iraq, Biden is ordering a drawdown for political reasons linked more to his progressive base than to facts. Perhaps he believes he can blame former President Donald Trump, who initially ordered the Afghan withdrawal, but leadership is not about abetting a disaster because it can be blamed on someone no longer in power.

What Biden has done, even if Trump began it, could destroy Afghanistan and will kneecap Iraq. Biden will never pay the price, but Iraqis, Afghans, and millions of new refugees likely will. Even if Iraq does not fail in the way Afghanistan may now do, he effectively abandons Iraq to militias whose national loyalty is more to Iran than Iraq. By giving these groups free range, Biden is essentially allowing them to loot Iraq on Tehran’s behalf. While many Americans assume that Iran finances the Iraqi militias, many Iraqis have said for the last two or three years that the flow of capital has gone the other way: Iraqi militias send money back to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.

Biden's political standing fuels Democratic worry about 2024

  Biden's political standing fuels Democratic worry about 2024 COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — It was supposed to be a moment of triumph for Joe Biden. The Democratic president had just signed into law the most significant infrastructure package in generations. And he had done it by bringing Democrats and Republicans together, just as he promised during last year's campaign. But when Biden arrived in New Hampshire last week to promote the $1 trillion package at the foot of a crumbling bridge, not all of his VIP guests were in the mood to celebrate. © Provided by Associated Press FILE - President Joe Biden speaks before signing the $1.

The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps can expect a windfall as the U.S. largely abandons Iraq. That's money that it will reinvest in insurgencies destabilizing Lebanon, Yemen, and Syria and perhaps soon Kuwait, eastern Saudi Arabia, or the West Bank.

Almost every decision Biden takes in the Middle East undermines U.S. national security, emboldens enemies, and exacerbates human tragedy. All senators look in the mirror and see a future president, and all presidents obsess about their legacy. Biden’s legacy is shaping up to be that of a country killer.

Michael Rubin (@Mrubin1971) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. He is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Tags: Opinion, Beltway Confidential, Blog Contributors, Iraq, Iran

Original Author: Michael Rubin

Original Location: Joe Biden, country killer

Fact check: Biden tells inaccurate story about his 1973 meeting with Israeli PM .
President Joe Biden has a favorite story about his long relationship with Israel. For decades, he has been publicly recounting his 1973 meeting with then-Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir -- which he described in 2015 as "one of the most consequential meetings I've ever had in my life."President Joe Biden has a favorite story about his long relationship with Israel. For decades, he has been publicly recounting his 1973 meeting with then-Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir -- which he described in 2015 as "one of the most consequential meetings I've ever had in my life.

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