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World: UN immigration official says migrants captured by the Libyan Coast Guard are disappearing in the thousands within 'unofficial' facilities run by traffickers and militias

EU praises Bosnia for improved migration management

  EU praises Bosnia for improved migration management SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — The European Union praised as a sign of progress the opening of a new migrant facility Friday in Bosnia, which had been criticized over the plight of migrants stranded in the dysfunctional Balkan country during their long trek to richer destinations. The new, organized Lipa camp, in the northwestern Krajina region, can accommodate, screen and register up to 1,500 people, and includes safe zones for unaccompanied minors and vulnerable people.

In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019 file photo, rescued migrants are seated next to a coast guard boat in the city of Khoms, Libya, around 120 kilometers (75 miles) east of Tripoli. When millions of euros started flowing from the European Union into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and to stop human trafficking. That hasn’t happened AP Photo/Hazem Ahmed, File © Provided by Business Insider In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019 file photo, rescued migrants are seated next to a coast guard boat in the city of Khoms, Libya, around 120 kilometers (75 miles) east of Tripoli. When millions of euros started flowing from the European Union into Libya to slow the tide of migrants crossing the Mediterranean, the money came with EU promises to improve detention centers notorious for abuse and to stop human trafficking. That hasn’t happened AP Photo/Hazem Ahmed, File
  • The Libyan Coast Guard captured 15,000 migrants in the first seven months of 2021.
  • Only 6,000 of the 15,000 captured migrants were transferred to official detention centers.
  • International aid groups say the detention centers are overcrowded and lack basic amenities.

In the first seven months of 2021, more than 15,000 migrants were captured by the Libyan Coast Guard and other authorities as they tried to cross international waters and reach Europe. However, only about 6,000 of the migrants who were captured were being held in designated migrant detention facilities, a New Yorker investigation found.

Doctor warns Iraqi Kurds: Illegal path to EU can be deadly

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Federico Soda, the International Organization for Migration's chief of mission in Libya, told the New Yorker that "the numbers simply don't add up." He believes migrants are disappearing within "unofficial" detention facilities run by militias and traffickers, which the United Nations has accused the Libyan Coast Guard of collaborating with, the New Yorker reported.

Rights groups demand ICC probe into Libya migrant abuses

  Rights groups demand ICC probe into Libya migrant abuses THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Human rights activists sent a dossier of evidence to the International Criminal Court on Tuesday demanding an investigation into abuses of migrants in Libya that they argue “may amount to crimes against humanity.” The filing, which is confidential, is the latest attempt to have ICC prosecutors investigate the treatment of migrants seeking to make dangerous trips across the Mediterranean Sea to Europe in smugglers'The filing, which is confidential, is the latest attempt to have ICC prosecutors investigate the treatment of migrants seeking to make dangerous trips across the Mediterranean Sea to Europe in smugglers' boats.

In addition to the country's fifteen recognized detention centers, the number of unofficial detention sites has "mushroomed" in recent years, according to IOM.

International aid organizations have raised concerns about reports they have received of conditions in both official and unofficial migrant detention centers, with countless survivors and escapees recounting their sexual abuse, extortion, and even torture at the hands of guards, the New Yorker reported.

Migrant boat capsizes in English Channel; at least 31 dead

  Migrant boat capsizes in English Channel; at least 31 dead CALAIS, France (AP) — At least 31 migrants bound for Britain died Wednesday when their boat sank in the English Channel, in what France’s interior minister called the biggest migration tragedy on the dangerous crossing to date. Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin said 34 people were believed to have been on the boat. Authorities found 31 bodies — including those of five women and a young girl — and two survivors, he said. One person appeared to still be missing. The nationalities of the travelers was not immediately known. © Provided by Associated Press French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin answers the press in Calais, northern France, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021.

Many migrants used Libya as a transit point before setting off for Europe, which has hardened its stance toward newcomers and financially backed the Libyan Coast Guard, according to the Migration Policy Institute. The perilous journey is made by thousands of migrants for a variety of reasons, including forced displacement, economic opportunities, and fleeing war and persecution, according to Human Rights Watch.

Osman, a Sudanese immigrant who fled conflict in Darfur and was later held in Libya's largest detention center, told Amnesty International how the guards subjected detainees to torture: "When they beat you, it's to the level of death: you wish for death. They would come drunk in the nights and harass people until the morning."

Mass arrests conducted by Libyan authorities last month have exacerbated already dire conditions within the centers. Aid organizations like the International Rescue Committee, who have sent staff and volunteers to the centers, have reported extreme malnourishment and starvation, overcrowding, and a lack of basic amenities like toilets, sleeping mats, and clean water.

Libyan law permits these migrants to be detained indefinitely without access to a lawyer, as well as sold into forced labor, according to the New Yorker.

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Migrant crisis front and center in pope's Greece-Cyprus trip .
LESBOS, Greece (AP) — When Pope Francis visited the Greek island of Lesbos in 2016, he was so moved by the stories he heard from families fleeing war in Iraq and Syria that he wept and brought a dozen refugees home with him. Speaking to reporters on the way home that day, he held up a drawing handed to him by a child from the island’s sprawling refugee camp. “Look at this one,” he said, revealing a bird neatly decorated in colored pencil, the word “peace” scrolled in English underneath it. “That’s what children want: Peace.

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