World: German politician says the country might have to cancel Oktoberfest because of a gas shortage caused by Russia

Fact check: False claim that Permian Basin oil supply would fuel America for 200 years

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Workers add the huge roof tarpaulins on the wooden structure at a beer tent on July 8 2022, in Munich. Photo by Peter Kneffel/picture alliance via Getty Images © Photo by Peter Kneffel/picture alliance via Getty Images Workers add the huge roof tarpaulins on the wooden structure at a beer tent on July 8 2022, in Munich. Photo by Peter Kneffel/picture alliance via Getty Images
  • A German politician said she may suggest that Munich cancel Oktoberfest this year.
  • The famed festival — which draws millions — is set to return after a two-year pandemic hiatus.
  • But a gas shortage caused by Russia's war in Ukraine is looming over the celebration.

A German politician said the country may consider doing the unthinkable: cancel its famed Oktoberfest beer festival because of a gas shortage caused by Russia.

Russia waging gas war with supply cuts - Zelensky

  Russia waging gas war with supply cuts - Zelensky Ukraine's president accuses Moscow of using gas restrictions to inflict misery on ordinary Europeans.Russian energy firm Gazprom announced it is reducing gas flows into Germany to allow work on a turbine on the Nord Stream 1 pipeline.

Rosi Steinberger, a lawmaker in Germany's Bavaria state, said she was weighing suggesting that Munich cancel this year's Oktoberfest as the country's gas supply becomes increasingly strained, the New York Times reported on Friday.

"I haven't asked yet," Steinberger told the Times. "But I also think that when people say there should be no taboos in what we consider — well, that's what you have to think about."


Video: Russian gas? Nein danke, says German district (Reuters)

Oktoberfest — the days-long festival in Munich that draws millions of people each year — is slated to return in late September after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Looming over the celebration, however, is a new emergency measure approved by the Council of the European Union on Tuesday that will see its member states cut gas consumption by 15% from August to March.

Isolation complication? US finds it's hard to shun Russia

  Isolation complication? US finds it's hard to shun Russia WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration likes to say Russia has become isolated internationally because of its invasion of Ukraine. Yet Moscow's top officials have hardly been cloistered in the Kremlin. And now, even the U.S. wants to talk. President Vladimir Putin has been meeting with world leaders, including Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose country is a NATO member. Meanwhile, his top diplomat, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, is jetting around the world, smiling, shaking hands and posing for photos with foreign leaders — including some friends of the U.S. And on Wednesday, Secretary of State Antony Blinken said he wants to end months of top-level U.S.

The voluntary action will allow the EU to save on gas in case Russia cuts off gas to the continent, a threat as European countries continue to sanction Russia over its unprovoked invasion of Ukraine.

Russia is "continuously using energy supplies as a weapon," the council said in a Tuesday statement.

Germany, which is heavily reliant on Russian gas, is feeling the strain of the energy crisis. Cities across the country — including Munich — have been forced to turn to energy-saving initiatives like limiting heating and lighting.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Pentagon says Russia has suffered as many as 80,000 casualties in Ukraine and lost thousands of armored vehicles .
An official said the figures are "pretty remarkable considering that the Russians have achieved none" of Putin's objectives from the start of the war.Roughly 70,000 to 80,000 Russian soldiers have been killed or wounded during the first five and a half months of the war, Colin Kahl, the undersecretary of defense for policy, said during a press briefing Monday, adding that the figure is "pretty remarkable considering that the Russians have achieved none of Vladimir Putin's objectives at the beginning of the war.

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