World: Ukraine war hangs over UN meeting on nukes treaty's legacy

Russia, Ukraine trade missile strikes on war's 150th day

  Russia, Ukraine trade missile strikes on war's 150th day KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russia's military fired a barrage of missiles Saturday at an airfield in central Ukraine, killing at least three people, while Ukrainian forces launched rocket strikes on river crossings in a Russian-occupied southern region. The attacks on key infrastructure on the 150th day of Russia's war in Ukraine marked new attempts by the warring parties to tip the scales of the grinding conflict in their favor. In Ukraine's centralThe attacks on key infrastructure on the 150th day of Russia's war in Ukraine marked new attempts by the warring parties to tip the scales of the grinding conflict in their favor.

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — There was already plenty of trouble to talk about when a major U.N. meeting on the landmark Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty was originally supposed to happen in 2020.

FILE - People watch a television screen showing a news program reporting about North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) at a train station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 25, 2022. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - People watch a television screen showing a news program reporting about North Korea's intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) at a train station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 25, 2022. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

Now the pandemic-postponed conference finally starts Monday as Russia's war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying to reinforce the 50-year-old treaty.

Neither Moscow nor Kyiv can control Ukraine's skies. These are the jets they're using to fight the air war.

  Neither Moscow nor Kyiv can control Ukraine's skies. These are the jets they're using to fight the air war. As of late July, observers have identified 36 Russian aircraft and 35 Ukrainian aircraft as lost, but the totals for both sides are likely higher.Throughout the buildup to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, NATO countries, including the US, insisted they would not send troops to the region amid concern that the presence of their personnel on the ground would lead to a dangerous escalation of the conflict.

“It is a very, very difficult moment," said Beatrice Fihn, the executive director of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Russia's invasion, accompanied by ominous references to its nuclear arsenal, “is so significant for the treaty and really going to put a lot of pressure on this,” she said. “How governments react to the situation is going to shape future nuclear policy.”

FILE - In this photo released by the U.S. Navy, the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Wyoming approaches Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., Jan. 9, 2008. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (Lt. Rebecca Rebarich/U.S. Navy via AP, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this photo released by the U.S. Navy, the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Wyoming approaches Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., Jan. 9, 2008. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (Lt. Rebecca Rebarich/U.S. Navy via AP, File)

The four-week meeting aims to generate a consensus on next steps, but expectations are low for a substantial — if any — agreement.

Moldova says it fears a Russian invasion as more neighbors ring alarm over Ukraine war

  Moldova says it fears a Russian invasion as more neighbors ring alarm over Ukraine war Moldova, which neighbors Ukraine, has a breakaway region backed by Russian forces. The Moldovan prime minister said a Russian invasion is "a risk."Throughout the buildup to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, NATO countries, including the US, insisted they would not send troops to the region amid concern that the presence of their personnel on the ground would lead to a dangerous escalation of the conflict.

Still, Swiss President Ignazio Cassis, prime ministers Fumio Kishida of Japan and Frank Bainimarama of Fiji, and more than a dozen nations' foreign ministers are among attendees expected from at least 116 countries, according to a U.N. official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to speak publicly before the conference.

In force since 1970, the Nonproliferation Treaty has the widest adherence of any arms control agreement. Some 191 countries have joined.

FILE - Flags fly outside United Nations headquarters in New York during the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Jennifer Peltz, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Flags fly outside United Nations headquarters in New York during the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Jennifer Peltz, File)

Nations without nuclear weapons promised not to acquire them, while nuclear-armed Britain, China, France, Russia (then the Soviet Union) and the United States agreed to negotiate toward eliminating their arsenals someday. All endorsed everyone’s right to develop peaceful nuclear energy.

Risks, mined waters slow rush to extract grains from Ukraine

  Risks, mined waters slow rush to extract grains from Ukraine Shipping companies are not rushing to export millions of tons of trapped grain out of Ukraine, despite a breakthrough deal to provide safe corridors through the Black Sea. That is because the waters are mined, ship owners are still assessing the risks and many still have questions over how the deal will unfold. The complexities of the agreement have set off a slow, cautious start, but it's only good for 120 days — and the clock began ticking last week.The goal over the next four months is to get some 20 million tons of grain out of three Ukrainian sea ports blocked since the Feb. 24 invasion.

India and Pakistan, which didn't sign, went on to get the bomb. So did North Korea, which ratified the pact but later announced it was withdrawing. Non-signatory Israel is believed to have a nuclear arsenal but neither confirms nor denies it.

Nonetheless, the Nonproliferation Treaty has been credited with limiting the number of nuclear newcomers (U.S. President John F. Kennedy once foresaw as many as 20 nuclear-armed nations by 1975) and serving as a framework for international cooperation on disarmament.

The total number of nuclear weapons worldwide has shrunk by more than 75% from a mid-1980s peak, largely due to the end of the Cold War between the U.S. and the former Soviet Union. But experts estimate roughly 13,000 warheads remain worldwide, the vast majority in the U.S. and Russia.

Meetings to assess how the treaty is working are supposed to happen every five years, but the 2020 conference was repeatedly delayed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Challenges have only grown in the meantime.

When launching the Ukraine war in February, Russian President Vladimir Putin warned that any attempt to interfere would lead to “consequences you have never seen” and emphasized that his country is “one of the most potent nuclear powers.” Days later, Putin ordered Russia's nuclear forces to be put on higher alert, a move that U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called “bone-chilling.”

'New Cold War': Russia and West vie for influence in Africa

  'New Cold War': Russia and West vie for influence in Africa JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Russian, French and American leaders are crisscrossing Africa to win support for their positions on the war in Ukraine, waging what some say is the most intense competition for influence on the continent since the Cold War. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and French President Emanuel Macron are each visiting several African countries this week. Samantha Power, head of the U.S. Agency for International Development, went to Kenya and Somalia last week. The U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Linda Thomas-Greenfield, will go to Ghana and Uganda next week.

FILE - Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida arrives for the official G7 summit welcome ceremony at Castle Elmau in Kruen, near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, Sunday, June 26, 2022. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. At least one head of government is expected: Kishida, of Japan, the only country ever to experience a nuclear attack. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida arrives for the official G7 summit welcome ceremony at Castle Elmau in Kruen, near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, Sunday, June 26, 2022. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. At least one head of government is expected: Kishida, of Japan, the only country ever to experience a nuclear attack. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)

“The prospect of nuclear conflict, once unthinkable, is now back within the realm of possibility,” he said.


Video: Russian referendums in occupied areas 'void' - Ukraine (Reuters)

The events in Ukraine create a tricky choice for the upcoming conference, said Patricia Lewis, a former U.N. disarmament research official who is now at the international affairs think tank Chatham House in London.

“On the one hand, in order to support the treaty and what it stands for, governments will have to address Russia’s behavior and threats,” she said. “On the other hand, to do so risks dividing the treaty members.”

Ukraine’s Push to Take Back This City Could Make or Break the War

  Ukraine’s Push to Take Back This City Could Make or Break the War The war in Ukraine could be breaking out into a new phase in the coming days, as Ukrainian forces gear up to launch a make-or-break counteroffensive against Kherson, a key city which Russian forces have occupied since the early days of the war. Ukrainian forces have been preparing for weeks to to run an attack on Kherson, a key city in the south, close to Russia’s strongholds. The counteroffensive is “gathering momentum,” according to a British intelligence analysis issued Thursday.But some American officials and lawmakers are hesitant to say the Ukrainian forces are guaranteed a victory if they go all in now.

Another uncomfortable dynamic: The war has heightened some countries' apprehensions about not having nuclear weapons, especially since Ukraine once housed but gave up a trove of Soviet nukes.

Conference participants can stress other security strategies or emphasize the costs and dangers of acquiring nuclear weapons, but "it's important not to be too preachy,” said Michael O’Hanlon of the Brookings Institution think tank in Washington.

“The idea that we can just look other countries in the face and say, ‘You’re better off without the bomb' — that’s a bit of a hard argument to carry right now categorically," said O'Hanlon, a senior fellow specializing in defense and security.

FILE - Russian President Boris Yeltsin, left, U.S. President Bill Clinton, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma, and British Prime Minister John Major, far right, sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty during the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) summit in Budapest, Hungary, Monday, Dec. 5, 1994. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Marcy Nighswander, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Russian President Boris Yeltsin, left, U.S. President Bill Clinton, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma, and British Prime Minister John Major, far right, sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty during the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) summit in Budapest, Hungary, Monday, Dec. 5, 1994. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Marcy Nighswander, File)

Ukraine is hardly the only hot topic.

North Korea appears to have been preparing recently for its first nuclear weapons test since 2017. Talks about reviving the deal meant to keep Iran from developing nukes are in limbo.

Two of Putin's top Russian pilots were killed by US-supplied HIMARS, report says

  Two of Putin's top Russian pilots were killed by US-supplied HIMARS, report says One of the Russian pilots' fathers revealed that he believed his son's death was caused by HIMARS, a long-range weapons system from the US.Throughout the buildup to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, NATO countries, including the US, insisted they would not send troops to the region amid concern that the presence of their personnel on the ground would lead to a dangerous escalation of the conflict.

The U.S. and Russia have only one remaining treaty curtailing their nuclear weapons and have been developing new technologies. Britain last year raised a self-imposed cap on its stockpile. China says it's modernizing — or, the U.S. claims, expanding — the world's third-largest nuclear arsenal.

FILE - Beatrice Fihn, of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, ICAN, speaks during a news conference at the headquarters of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP, File): FILE - In this photo released by the U.S. Navy, the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Wyoming approaches Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., Jan. 9, 2008. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (Lt. Rebecca Rebarich/U.S. Navy via AP, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this photo released by the U.S. Navy, the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS Wyoming approaches Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., Jan. 9, 2008. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (Lt. Rebecca Rebarich/U.S. Navy via AP, File)

Daryl Kimball, who heads the nonprofit Arms Control Association in Washington, can't recall another time when the Nonproliferation Treaty has come up for review with "so many difficulties in so many different areas, and where we have seen such severe tensions between the major players.”

U.S. Ambassador Adam Scheinman, the presidential special representative for nuclear nonproliferation, said Washington hopes for a “balanced” outcome that “sets realistic goals and advances our national and international security interests."

“You can have no doubt that Russia’s actions will affect the climate at the conference and prospects for an agreed outcome document. Other difficult issues may complicate this, as well. But I’m prepared to be somewhat optimistic," he said in a telephone briefing.

FILE - Traffic and pedestrians make their way up First Avenue in front of United Nations headquarters in New York during the 75th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - Traffic and pedestrians make their way up First Avenue in front of United Nations headquarters in New York during the 75th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. A major United Nations meeting on the landmark nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is starting Monday, Aug. 1, 2022, after a long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as Russia’s war in Ukraine has reanimated fears of nuclear confrontation and cranked up the urgency of trying reinforce the 50-year-old treaty. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

The Associated Press sent inquiries to Russia’s U.N. mission about Moscow’s goals for the conference. There was no immediate response.

In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said his country wants to work toward improving global nuclear governance and upholding the international order and will "firmly safeguard the legitimate security and development interests and rights of China and the developing world.”

If the world can't speak with one voice, disarmament advocates say a strong statement from a large group of countries could send a meaningful message.

In recent years, frustration with the Nonproliferation Treaty catalyzed another pact that outright prohibits nuclear weapons. Ratified by over 60 countries, it took effect last year, though without any nuclear-armed nations on board.

At a recent meeting in Vienna, participating countries condemned “any and all nuclear threats” and inked a lengthy plan that includes considering an international trust fund for people harmed by nuclear weapons.

Fihn, whose Geneva-based group campaigned for the nuclear ban treaty, hopes the vigor in Vienna serves as inspiration — or notice — for countries to make progress at the U.N. conference.

“If you don’t do it here," she said, “we’re moving on without you elsewhere.”

___

Associated Press writer Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations and AP journalist Liu Zheng in Beijing contributed to this report.

Pentagon says Russia has suffered as many as 80,000 casualties in Ukraine and lost thousands of armored vehicles .
An official said the figures are "pretty remarkable considering that the Russians have achieved none" of Putin's objectives from the start of the war.Roughly 70,000 to 80,000 Russian soldiers have been killed or wounded during the first five and a half months of the war, Colin Kahl, the undersecretary of defense for policy, said during a press briefing Monday, adding that the figure is "pretty remarkable considering that the Russians have achieved none of Vladimir Putin's objectives at the beginning of the war.

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